<< Back to all Blogs
Login or Create your own free blog
Layout:
Home > Warming Up the Hands
 

Warming Up the Hands

February 8th, 2013 at 01:11 pm

I know some of you are probably so sick of hearing about Mr. Money Mustache. !!

Anyway, had an article that I think a few SA-ers would enjoy. It is about reducing energy costs. IT was a guest post, actually.

http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/02/01/the-oil-well-you-c...

Anyway, I think regionally we tend to be extremely frugal with our energy usage. Part of it is living in an efficient house. The other part is not believing in leaving the house the same temp 24/7 all year (which seems incredibly common).

I think living in a warmer climate, I was reluctant to do much more though. Keep the house colder inside than outside? Not really logical, know what I mean?

BUT, over the years I have been working on acclimation. I know it's very possible, because living in far less energy efficient homes over the years, and with very frugal parents, I am not accustomed to heat at night. In fact, I can't sleep if it is too warm. So I really do think you just get used to what you get used to.

Likewise, we didn't grow up in such a hot climate, so setting the AC anything below 80 sounds CRAZY to me (during summer). Can we just be happy that it is 30 degrees cooler inside than outside? When I was a child hot days were rare, there was no AC, and we just sweated it out. My mom is reluctant to move up here because of the heat. She doesn't deal well with it. I always tell her she should move up here because it's like living in a fridge. The AC is cranked up so much *everywhere.* At home, it's leave the AC house to the AC car to the AC office to the AC store. Know what I mean? I don't even have a summer wardrobe, really. I am usually wearing sweaters to work so I don't freeze, because still not used to this AC culture. I agree the AC is needed for basic survival, here. But I think most of us would survive at 90F and be quite comfortable at 80F. I don't know why I have to bring sweaters everywhere when it is 110F outside, so I don't completely freeze inside wherever I am. Our culture is just so ridiculously wasteful.

Anyway, on the heat, every single year we seem to improve on the last, as we work on acclimation. I don't have anything working against me except my self. The boys in my house do not use the heat much. So, I am the only one working on acclimation. (They do tend to use the AC more than I - I could live with it a little warmer than them - so evens out I guess).

I've had my eyes on some fingerless gloves. I've got gloves, but I think the fingerless variety would be nice around the house. I turned up the heat the other day because I just could not get my HANDS warm.

SO, I saw this article and found it kind of fascinating. Apparently muscle generates a lot of heat. & females lose heat in their hands and feet faster. It REALLY clicked for me. So I think investing in some gloves could go a long way for me - warm hands probably could mean lower energy bills. By a LOT I am guessing. {I also never thought anything about wearing a hat inside, but is also something to consider}.

I have a better understanding of my children. They are all muscle/no fat (just how they are) and they are like little furnaces. Sometime I will sneak a blanket on them in the middle of the night (because I presume they are half as cold as I would be) and then you know, they wake up drenched in sweat. I have since learned to let them monitor their own body temp. I can't say other people (teachers, etc.) have learned. We are the weirdos who send the kids to school without jackets. There is every so often a tale where a well meaning teacher made them wear a jacket - I am sure not necessary in the least. I figure where we live - it's not like it's the end of the world to not wear a sweater. They are fine. So I call them little furnaces. Very true. The article above said that muscle was more efficient at keeping you warm, than fat. I totally *get* it. I think just being female would make me less efficient - as females have higher body fat in general. This explains a lot in my house.

Now I am off to find some hand warmers.

8 Responses to “Warming Up the Hands”

  1. snafu Says:

    It easier to keep warm by layering clothes like T-shirt + shirt + sweater + fleece hoodie. Silk 2 pce long john set is comfortable and wonderful for warmth without adding bulk. Fingerless gloves work so long as there is no liquid to be handled. I suggest trying so type of knit tuque/hat as so much heat is lost from the head.

    To stay cool in hot humid climates it helps to wear a wet bandana; there are tubes that have water absorbent beads inserted to stay wet and help keep you cool. A big brimmed straw hat does wonders to keep the sun from feeling so hot.

  2. pretty cheap jewelry Says:

    Here's a plethora of free instructions on making fingerless gloves from recycled sweaters or socks or tshirts
    http://www.instructables.com/tag/type-id/?q=wool fingerless ...
    and there's plenty under $5 for sale on Etsy
    http://www.etsy.com/search?q=fingerless glove -pattern&order...

  3. creditcardfree Says:

    Today, I'm wearing a long sleeve t shirt, a fleece, and a scarf around my neck. It's amazing how the scarf keeps the chill off my neck. I have worn a hat in the house before to stay warm too. I too don't like to be warm during the night.

  4. wowitsawonderfullife Says:

    Two comments. I have a fabulous pair of mittens where the top part pulls back to reveal fingerless gloves. The other point I have is that, while I'm happy to pull on a sweater, I don't want to ever have to wear a hat/scarf/mittens to be warm enough in my home. Do you all do this just as an environmental thing or is it an electricity cost thing. I'm not judging if it's either of these reasons because both are good reason. But I can't imagine being uncomfortable in my home. Does that make sense?

  5. twest Says:

    Actually I am so glad that you have talked about mr money moustache. I have started going through all his posts from when he first began his blog. I really am finding it beneficial and very enjoyable. Thanks for sharing this with us.

  6. FrugalTexan75 Says:

    I also tend to turn the heat up mainly because my hands or feet are cold. I "made" some fingerless gloves by cutting off the tips of a cheap pair. They didn't last too long, maybe a few months - but sure were nice, especially when I was at the computer!

  7. ThriftoRama Says:

    My kids are 'hot sleepers' too!@

  8. MonkeyMama Says:

    @Wow - that is fine. But the whole point is if you just put on a hat on some mittens that you are not uncomfortable at all. ??? To me, this has absolutely nothing to do with being uncomfortable.

    For me, this is also about co-existing with people who are uncomfortable when I turn up the heat.

    I think it is also a large element of just questioning cultural norms. Of blindly doing things because that is what you have always done. Our culture is tremendously wasteful. Mr. Money Mustache is admittedly extreme, and the article was written by a woman who lives in Alaska. Which makes whining about keeping the house at 60 degrees just seem kind of silly. It's not that I believe in being *that* extreme, but gives us perspective. You don't melt if you walk or bike in the extreme cold - people do it all the time - that kind of thing. So maybe turning the thermostat down a couple of degrees isn't the end of the world. (IT really isn't).

    If it's not your thing, it's not your thing. Nothing wrong with that.

Leave a Reply

(Note: If you were logged in, we could automatically fill in these fields for you.)
*
Will not be published.
   

* Please spell out the number 9.  [ Why? ]

vB Code: You can use these tags: [b] [i] [u] [url] [email]