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How To Track Savings Subaccounts

January 20th, 2013 at 08:00 am

Petunia asked me some questions about my savings methods, and I thought she might find my method useful.

I found this idea on a personal finance blog many moons ago. I don't remember what blog. I would much prefer to link the clear and concise instructions I read many years ago. Big Grin But I will try my best.

One banking benefit that I really don't give a flip about is subaccounts. My spreadsheet method is an alternative to relying on bank functionality.

I suppose I do it this way is so that I can completely divorce *where* my money is from *what* it is. My banking strategy is basically to find the consistently highest interest rates with the least hassle and fees. My savings strategy is to save x for a and to save y for b. Combining the two strategies gives me a headache. Using a spreadsheet just keeps it separate.

At current I basically have 3 savings accounts. I always keep a token amount in my old account when I find a better interest rate and move to a new account. So I will in general always have two online savings accounts. I will close the lowest performing account when I find a better interest rate elsewhere, so there is always generally two accounts. I also have a savings account at my primary credit union, linked to my checking account. I always keep about $1,000 in there. Give or take, it doesn't have to be exact. (My checking account is little more than a conduit, I always run it to $0. The $1,000 account means I don't literally only have $0 at my disposal. You could call it a baby emergency fund. The interest rate sucks, but I have instant access to it. Though frankly, the primary reason I have/use the account is so that I don't transfer money back and forth to other accounts very frequently. You will see what I mean...).

FIRST, you do not need any fancy software to track subaccounts. I use openoffice. You can download it for free. (It is virtually identical to Excel - which just cost a LOT more). Or if you have any other spreadsheet software at your disposal...

I will start with the main sheet and then drill down:



My sub-accounts are: Short-term cash, mid-term cash, medical fund, and cash Efund. (Your subaccounts can be anything and everything. Vacation Funds, down payment funds, debt payoff funds, car replacement funds, however you organize things).

The totals for the subaccounts are being pulled from other spreadsheets. I have one "sheet" for each subaccount.

This first sheet reconciles the total in each subaccount with the grand total of all my savings accounts. **I just manually enter the bank balances at the end of the month.** I check that it is balanced about once every month (after the end of the month). If the difference between both totals is -zero-, then there is success!!

**You do not have to limit yourself to cash. If you have bonds, mutual funds, stocks, whatever, same method can be used.**

Okay, now for the subaccounts.

Let's start with an easy one:



CASH EFUND. This balance has been $5k *forever.* I don't have to do much with this.

My medical savings is the same kind of thing.

The ones I update regularly are the short-term and the mid-term, as I save a set amount monthly towards these savings accounts:





As I mentioned before, the totals just automatically flow through to my first subaccount Total sheet.

I generally enter the income and the outflow to these subaccounts as I make the transfers or payments. Since I generally charge everything, I usually do all this ahead of time before I actually need the money or do the actual transfers. BUT this should still work fine for a more cash method. You don't want to make 10 transfers every month from your bank account (there are legal limits and penalties for that kind of thing!). But, the money I transfer every month generally serves as a buffer until I finalize it all at the end of the month. If I have plenty of money in my checking account I might do my regular "to savings transfers" at the beginning of the month, and figure out what I need to transfer back, later. BUT, if not, I just leave it all to figure at the end of the month. Many months the two figures (to savings/from savings) are kind of a wash. I most often do just one transfer a month, and I will explain that at the end.

**I do think using an electronic check register, like Quicken, is essential with the way I do things. I often just move things around so that my checking balance is always positive. This is far more complicated to do with pen and paper. In a really spendy month I can easily rejigger in Quicken - change a payment date here and there.**

Anyway, so I jot it all down as the info becomes available, but put an "x" next to each transaction when I literally record it in Quicken (or you could do the same when you record it into whatever kind of check register you use - paper or electronic). When I record it in Quicken is not necessarily when transfers are made. This just means, I didn't forget anything in my check register. If everything has an "x", everything will easily reconcile, UNLESS I messed up a spreadsheet formula. Which is usually what throws me off once in a blue moon.

Okay, so now that you see the nitty gritty details for each account, let's go back to the summary.



Got it?

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Two more notes:

This is what my $1,000 linked savings account (with crappy interest) generally looks like:



I am not a stickler on the $1,000. It's just if the amount starts to get to be more than $1,000 at the end of every single month, then I know I have some money to transfer to my higher interest savings. Likewise, if the account balance is $5,000, but I know I have $4,000 in bills coming up - I just leave the $5,000 in there.

Finally...

** I do not do 10+ transfers per month to/from my savings accounts!**

I generally do one transfer per month.

What I do is add up all the money I need to transfer back out of savings (adding up all the little things in my spreadsheets), and put the total in my Quicken register (check register). That could be one total for 10 transactions.

In this example I needed to transfer $1,665 for several different insurances and expenses. This my checking account register:



It's really this simple. I need to transfer $1900 to savings, but I need to pull out $1,665 for expenses. SO, the net is $235.

What I actually do is just transfer $235 to savings. The End!

{Looking at the savings register above, before this last check register, you will note I did just *one* 12/30 transfer for a heck of a lot of transactions. There were like 8 transactions - all I did was transfer $570 to savings at the end of the month}.

**Quicken is a little finicky about this. What I do is delete all savings transfers when they download, and hit the "reconcile" button. I find if I do it this way, and manually reconcile the savings transfers, it works beautifully. If you try to finalize the reconciliation automatically, during the download process - which is quite easy to do by accident - then things can get messy. & it won't let you go back and mark off the savings transfers to make it balance. But after a while you know better NOT to do that. You will learn quickly once you figure out how to make it work. The trick is to choose to reconcile *before* closing off the "accept/match transactions" screen.**

So there you have it. What appears to be a little bit complicated actually just makes my life VERY simple.

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For the spreadsheet uneducated, I found this. I am sure there are also lots of useful internet and library resources. My spreadsheets that I have shared are VERY basic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kNEv3s8TuA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeMSV9T1PoI

I also use spreadsheets to track our net worth, and to track all things financial. ALSO is really great for loan amortizations. Etc., etc.

7 Responses to “How To Track Savings Subaccounts”

  1. sarah Says:

    I like your system. I do something similar with savings and it works very well.

  2. Tightwad Kitty Says:

    Thank you for such a detailed How to Track Saving Subaccounts.

  3. Petunia 100 Says:

    Thank you for taking the time to share all of that! Reading through, I can tell that it sounds more involved than it actually is in practice. Smile
    I also notice that you are allocating all of the interest to "mid-term". Is that for simplicity?

  4. FrugalTexan75 Says:

    MM,
    You know, if you ever want to do something besides what you already do, you might have a future as a teacher. Smile Good explanation!

  5. Thrifty Ray Says:

    I keep track on my account on a spreadsheet as well. Love worksheets and tabs..and cells...and formulas Smile

  6. MonkeyMama Says:

    Thanks FT - I worried that it wouldn't make any sense. LOL. But, I was a piano teacher for many years, so I definitely know how to break things down. IT's just easier to do it in person I think. Big Grin {& I know if I took more time I could have made it better - I rushed through it a bit}.

    @Petunia - I suppose that is for simplicity, somewhat. But I have *always* saved my interest for the long run.

  7. PauletteGoddard Says:

    Thanks for this. I am in need of subaccounts guidance in 2014 and this looks like it'd work.

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